Are you a CHD Hero?

be-your-heart-hero-landingWhenever we hear someone is pregnant, it is a guarantee they will be asked if they want a boy or a girl and the response from the expectant parents is likely to be, “It doesn’t matter as long as the baby is healthy.” Unfortunately, there are babies that are not born healthy, but we wouldn’t trade them for the world.

Nearly 1 in 100 babies, worldwide, is born with a heart defect, making it the most common birth defect. Congenital means existing at birth, and while some may use the term “congenital heart disease,” (CHD) defect is much more accurate as the hearts of those born with CHDs did not develop normally.

While CHDs can be diagnosed in infancy or even in utero, some defects are more difficult to detect and might not be diagnosed until later in childhood or even adulthood.

Based on World Health Organization, over three quarters of CVD deaths take place in low- and middle-income countries.

People in low- and middle-income countries who suffer from CVDs and other noncommunicable diseases have less access to effective and equitable health care services which respond to their needs. As a result, many people in low- and middle-income countries are detected late in the course of the disease and die younger from CVDs and other noncommunicable diseases, often in their most productive years.

No matter where you live CHD is number 1 killer.

If you or someone you love is a CHD survivor, share your story. Let us know about the Hero-Fingers-Cute-miniatures-Super-Heroes-6.jpgamazing  doctors, donor and organizations who support. Help us to enhance collaboration through sharing knowledge and experience. Share your story with us in our new page dedicated to you a CHD HERO!




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s